MENU
Thinkwell

see more

Dodoma
Jakarta
Hanoi
Amman
Nairobi
Port-au-Prince
Monrovia
Cairo
Lusaka
Maputo
Dar Es Salaam
Antananarivo
Karachi
Dhaka
Manila
Thinkwell

Getting to Know our Team in Indonesia

06 April 2021

Across the world, ThinkWell staff are moving the needle on improving health and well-being around the globe. We wanted to take a moment to introduce you to some of our team in Indonesia.

Nadhila AdaniNadhila Adani, Data Management Analyst

What do you view as the greatest challenge to improving health in Indonesia?

Remote areas are hard to access. I once lived in a remote village in South-East Sulawesi, home to cocoa farms, for a community service program. The road there was just red soil that gets lumpy during rainy seasons, so we had to rent a pickup truck to get there. They had one community health clinic that was filled with sacks of cocoa beans and seemed no longer in use. The person in charge was a midwife, whose husband was a cocoa bean collector. She was seldom there but is the go-to person when anything happens to the villagers. She is the only health worker for maybe 100 households living in that village.

What’s been the most meaningful lesson that you’ve learned during your health career?

It’s expensive to be sick, especially when you’re a poor person who lives in rural areas. Despite government subsidies, access to good quality facilities and physicians are often the barrier to receiving proper care. Villagers rely on each other when a person gets sick, and social capital becomes important. Preventive and promotive measures [in rural areas] should not be neglected when designing a health system.

What’s a health statistic or fact that you can’t get out of your head? Why should everyone know it?

Indonesia has a high maternal mortality ratio (117 maternal deaths out of 100,000 live births in 2017), one of the highest in Southeast Asia. This stuck with me when I delivered my first child last August. Even though I knew most deaths happen because of high-risk pregnancies, or because they are attended by only one skilled person or sometimes nobody, or that deliveries happen in unsafe environments, the statistic made me chant endless prayers in my head as I went into labor.

Ryan NugrahaRyan Nugraha, Program Analyst

What was your life like before ThinkWell and why did you decide to join ThinkWell?

Before joining ThinkWell, I was a researcher with the Center for Health Economics and Policy Studies, University of Indonesia, as well as a practicing physician within the same university’s hospital. My life was spent juggling clinical, health economics, and health policy work (I know, a lot to juggle with!) until I decided to get my master’s degree at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. There, I decided to leave clinical work and pursue public health fully. Before working for University of Indonesia, I pursued an MD at the University of Padjadjaran and worked as a research intern in the same university for a year. I also worked as a medical officer in Bandung before coming to Jakarta (University of Indonesia).

What makes you hopeful about health progress in Indonesia?

We are approaching health in a collaborative manner. When breaking down important health issues, stakeholders jump in together and discuss it in a constructive manner. That makes me hopeful about the future of health and health systems in Indonesia. Things such as vested interest might reverse the progress. In health and development, it is important to come with clear conscience.

What’s been the most meaningful lesson that you’ve learned during your health career?

Listening is more powerful than counting. When we are looking at issues from the policy perspective, many things we decide come from numbers, correlation, etc. However, up to now, I still think that listening, especially listening to the voices of those who are not normally heard, yields the biggest impact.

Sushanty

Sushanty, Country Manager

What was your life like before ThinkWell and why did you decide to join ThinkWell?

I have 24 years of experience in development prior to joining to ThinkWell, providing technical and project management support to public health, education, gender, and humanitarian response programs. I do really enjoy my work because it impacts people to have a better life. I decided to join ThinkWell with eagerness to learn health financing! I agree with ThinkWell that a well-functioning health financing system facilitates the efficient delivery of affordable and high-quality health services. And I can see that is the area in Indonesia that needs to be strengthened.

What do you view as the greatest challenge to improving health and wellbeing in Indonesia?

Indonesia faces the challenge of increasing access to health services for marginalized people. Despite steady progress in improving the health and life expectancy of its citizens, Indonesia straggles in reducing maternal mortality and neonatal mortality, TB, HIV, and non-communicable diseases.

What makes you hopeful about health progress in your country?

Indonesia’s Universal Health Coverage system, which grew rapidly and covers 203 million people as the largest single-payer scheme in the world. It is showing that it is improving health equity and service access.

 

Nirwan MaulanaNirwan Maulana, Senior Analyst

What was your life like before ThinkWell and why did you decide to join ThinkWell?

Before ThinkWell, I hadn’t yet worked directly in the health sector. The Covid pandemic showed me that the health sector in Indonesia still has many problems and vulnerabilities. I wanted to contribute to improving the health sector by joining ThinkWell.

What do you view as the greatest challenge to improving health in Indonesia?

I think the main challenge is political will from government leaders. This can be translated to many things, such as finding the most capable people to manage the health sector, as well as deciding fiscal spending for the health sector, which should be larger than other non-productive spending (e.g., non-human capital investment), especially during the pandemic.

What’s a health statistic or fact that you can’t get out of your head? Why should everyone know it?

Out-of-pocket health spending in Indonesia is progressive toward economic status, even for national health insurance (JKN) members. Theoretically, the patterns should be more regressive. It turns out that higher-income people prefer premium healthcare, which is not fully covered by private insurance and JKN. They also prefer to not use JKN so they can instead get quicker services.

HalimahHalimah Mardani, Senior Analyst

What was your life like before ThinkWell and why did you decide to join ThinkWell?

Before joining ThinkWell, I worked in the National Team for the Acceleration of Poverty Reduction (TNP2K), the Office of the Vice President of the Republic of Indonesia, for more than seven years. I decided to join ThinkWell to expand my scope of work to an international level and bring knowledge about Indonesia to the world. Through ThinkWell’s Strategic Purchasing for Primary Health Care (SP4PHC) project, which takes place in five countries, I have gained a lot of international knowledge and experience.

What’s been the most meaningful lesson that you’ve learned during your health career?

I have learned about health issues from discussions with communities, health workers in remote areas, heads of community health centers (Puskesmas), and health offices in districts/cities. They have bright ideas that accommodate central policies while being grounded in their local specifics. I’ve also learned how to translate the results of a study for health policymaking purposes.

What’s a health statistic or fact that you can’t get out of your head? Why should everyone know it?

Indonesia is an archipelago country with the fourth largest population in the world. Dealing with 514 leaders of districts is very challenging, especially in the era of decentralization. Although several health policies have been decided at the national level, policy implementation is within the authority of the regions. Given the contextual differences across the regions, implementation is difficult.

Andhika MaulanaAndhika Nurwin Maulana, Senior Analyst, Data Management and Analysis

What was your life like before ThinkWell and why did you decide to join ThinkWell?

Previously, I worked on health sector and public financial management issues. I joined ThinkWell due to its broader experiences in public financing and focus on the health sector and health financing.

What do you view as the greatest challenge to improving health and wellbeing in your country?

Working in the health sector always has unique challenges, but politics around making funding more effective, efficient, and sustainable financing for a better health services is a big challenge.

TrihonoTrihono, Technical Advisor, Health Financing

What was your life like before ThinkWell and why did you decide to join ThinkWell?

Before joining ThinkWell, I worked at National Institute of Health Research & Development. I decided to join ThinkWell to support better health policy and its implementation. I believe ThinkWell supports evidence-based research and policy recommendations for better health policies.

What’s been the most meaningful lesson that you’ve learned during your health career?

Advocacy to policymakers is not easy. It needs consistent and continuous efforts to inform, advocate, and make recommendations.

What makes you hopeful about health progress in Indonesia?

We are facing many health problems that need strong leadership from the Indonesia’s Ministry of Health. Our new health minister always asks for inputs related to health development from many stakeholders. I believe that ThinkWell’s evidence-based suggestions will be able to help revise policies.

 

Designed by BothAssociates   /  Photo Credits